ICC world’s most preferred arbitral institute, global survey finds

May 21, 2021

ICC’s reputation as the world’s most preferred arbitral institute has been upheld in a major survey of arbitration professionals and users worldwide.

The 2020 Survey by Queen Mary University, London in partnership with law firm White & Case, reveals that of all nominations received, ICC stands out once more as the most preferred institution among arbitration providers, including market leaders featured in the rankings who have led the field for well over a decade.

The survey rankings reflect ICC’s standing as a truly global and independent institution with close to 100 years’ experience in resolving commercial disputes, and a contemporary purpose to leverage dispute resolution to secure more widespread peace and prosperity.

Going from strength to strength, the ICC International Court of Arbitration revealed record Arbitration and ADR numbers in 2020, reflecting its continuing global expansion efforts. To facilitate the management of cases and ensure ease of access to the institution’s trusted and reputed services, ICC today manages its growing arbitration caseload through 12 case management teams located on five continents – including most recently through a new case management office in Abu Dhabi Global Market, established in April 2020.

ICC Court President Alexis Mourre said: “ICC’s global reputation as the world’s preferred arbitral institute can be put down to the extensive experience we have accumulated as a result of resolving over 26,000 cases to date, combined with an ability and agility to lead change in line with the needs of the parties as well as legislative and technological developments.”

As the only arbitral forum truly independent from any singular legal culture or tradition, ICC enables parties and other users of arbitration to confidently resolve disputes through a diverse and complementary range of services. Having closed 2020 with a pending caseload amounting to an aggregate amount in dispute of US$ 258 billion – with the average amount in dispute in ICC cases at US$ 145 million – ICC has also gained a reputation as the leading provider of arbitration for large, complex, multi-party and multi-contract cases while also continuing to provide market leading services where smaller sums are in dispute.

View full survey finding here.





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